Fake products are denigrated. / SUR

Replica wines

While fake Rolex watches illegally use the name and logo of a world-famous brand, replica wines only copy styles, grape varieties and regions

ANDREW J. LINN

Products that are copies of the original are denigrated by most consumers.

The reason anyone goes for a fake, whether perfumes, Havana cigars, or caviar, is for economic considerations. Oddly, the selection of imitation wines is very limited.

America's Replica Wines follows the same technique of analysing the chemical components of the liquid and then attempting to assemble a similar product through careful blending and using laboratory controlled techniques.

In fact, not so different from what supermarkets expect when they ask wineries to create their own-brand wines.

However, they are bound to keep within certain limits, and the use of many additives is not permitted.

And, while fake Rolex watches illegally use the name and logo of a world-famous brand, replica wines only copy styles, grape varieties and regions.

Wine gets better with age. What we buy off the shelf isn't always at its peak and needs storing.

Essentially, the effects of a wine's tannins range from harsh to astringent, dry to smooth, luscious to silky. Now, if the latter descriptors sound more appealing, the drinker is likely to be a fan of bottle-aging whether he knows it or not.

What's unique about Replica is that it's openly admitting to copying, but who really wants to buy emulations of great wines just to save on the price?

Would a genuine wine enthusiast do this?

Would we serve them to guests? Almost certainly not. We can imagine the moment of pouring that first glass. "This Rioja is a synthetic copy of Viña Tondonia 1942.

The original costs around €525, if any can be found. Enjoy".

Would you?