surinenglish

Trump - the mirror

Of all the political catastrophes that have rained down on the planet in recent months, it's possible that Brexit will be the one with the most repercussions on the Costa del Sol - not necessarily on the tourism industry, but on the thousands of fellow citizens and neighbours of British origin we live and work with every day.

If you look at it from a global perspective, Brexit will be a mere drop compared with the ocean of consequences the arrival of Donald Trump at the White House could have on the world - but perhaps we shouldn't analyse them separately. Both phenomena originated the same way: the failure of traditional politics which paved the way for the penetration of populist discourse, the criminalisation of immigrants and minorities, the nostalgia for a prosperity enjoyed in unrepeatable circumstances. It's frightening to look at the map of Europe and see in how many countries the same scene is being recreated.

As well as the dreaded contagion effect, other common consequences are also foreseeable; it's possible that in the future it will be hard to differentiate the repercussions of Brexit from the repercussions of Trump.

The arrival of a misogynist, supremacist and xenophobic president is a terrible moral blow. But we must take advantage of the situation to sit ourselves in front of the mirror and not on the pedestal of moral superiority that we adopt when we look at the United States. Because right now, while we condemn the wall on the Mexican border we continue to ignore the razor wire fence in Ceuta; while we criticise the conflict of interests involved in the arrival of tycoons in the American government, we fail to stop the magnates who bring ex-ministers and ex-prime ministers into their boardrooms; while we censure the absence of blacks and Hispanics in Trump's government we are not even capable of imagining a gypsy or a Muslim in the Spanish cabinet. There's nothing like looking elsewhere to avoid looking at ourselves.