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Spain's Low Emission Zone law for larger towns and cities comes into force for vehicles from 1 January

In Malaga province, places with a population of over 50,000 that will be affected include: Mijas; Benalmádena; Estepona; Fuengirola; Malaga city; Marbella; Torremolinos and Vélez-Málaga

SUR MALAGA.

Spanish law requires that from the start of 2023 every place with more than 50,000 inhabitants must introduce Low Emission Zones, or ZBEs, which will prevent many cars from driving in their town or city centres. This scheme is already in force in some cities such as Madrid and Barcelona, but within a couple of days it will begin in numerous others, a fact of which many people are still unaware.

Sources this week said that only 13 per cent of the affected 150 municipalities in the country have laid out their plans due to a delay in publishing detailed implementation rules at a national level. This means that in reality, the rollout is likely to be gradual until the end of 2023, depending on the town. Motoring organisations have called on the government to set up its promised website that clearly states where the zones are going to be.

A survey by Sumauto has shown that nearly four out of ten drivers have no idea what type of environmental sticker their vehicle should have.

According to Sumauto, there are about 11.5m cars in the affected towns and the measure will hit nearly four million of them: those which do not have an official sticker. The stickers classify vehicles according to the pollution they produce and will determine which can enter town centres and which cannot.

Anyone who is not sure what type of engine their vehicle has can check in the user's manual, where it will appear as EU4, for example, or on the ITV vehicle inspection card. The stickers are different colours and will be labelled CERO, ECO, C or B.

In Malaga province, places over 50,000 whose town centres will be affected include: Mijas; Benalmádena; Estepona; Fuengirola; Malaga city; Marbella; Torremolinos and Vélez-Málaga.