Djokovic, pictured on 2 January at Marbella's Puente Romano tennis club. / JOSELE

Australia investigates Djokovic for lying about his travels

The tennis ace, who travelled to Melbourne from Spain to play the Australian Open, had declared that he hadn't been in any country other than Spain in the fortnight leading up to his journey Down Under. But this directly contradicts the social media posts he uploaded on Christmas Day which clearly show him in Belgrade

ENRIC GARDINER

Novak Djokovic's list of problems keep growing. The most recent scandal is currently being investigated by the Australian Border Force, who believe that the Serbian tennis player lied upon his arrival in the country.

Djokovic, who travelled to Melbourne from Spain to play the Australian Open, had declared that he hadn't been in any country other than Spain in the fortnight leading up to his journey Down Under. But this directly contradicts the social media posts he uploaded on Christmas Day which clearly show him in Belgrade, in his native Serbia.

On 2 January, Djokovic was training at the Puente Romano Tennis Club in Marbella, where his photograph was taken and later published in SUR.

This mistake could prove to be another setback for the world number one, despite winning a case this week presented by the Australian government to deport him due to the inconsistencies and the uncertainty surrounding his medical exemption from testing positive for Covid on 16 December.

Australia's minister for Immigration, Alex Hawke, has the power to unilaterally cancel Djokovic's visa, despite the outcome of the deportation case. This means that the latest information could play a crucial role in the minister's decision regarding the tennis player's status in the country.

When Djokovic arrived in Australia, he filled out a form and was questioned on whether he had travelled in the days leading up to his journey. The Serbian said 'no', despite having gone from Belgrade to Marbella, where he lives for a good portion of the year. The document that he handed in specified that any error or lie would be considered a "grave offence" and would be motive for civil sanction.