Cabin crew at Easyjet and Ryanair in Spain are planning to strike over the next few weeks. / reuters

EasyJet cabin crew union in Spain announces plan for nine days of strike action in July

The USO union is asking for a 40% increase in the basic salary, plus an increment for the number of hours they fly

EDURNE MARTÍNEZ Madrid

EasyJet cabin crew in Spain are planning nine days of strikes next month to try to unblock the negotiations on their salaries and working conditions. The strike is being called by the USO union, of which 80% of these employees (around 450) are members.

The 24-hour strikes have been called for 1, 2, 3, 15, 16, 17, 29, 30 and 31 July at the airports the airline uses as bases in Spain. These are Barcelona-El Prat, Malaga and Palma de Mallorca, where it has six, seven and five planes respectively.

USO’s secretary general at easyJet Malaga, Miguel Galán, said it is regrettable that the airline is not interested in negotiating an improvement to working conditions in Spain. He explained that the basic salary for cabin crew is 950 euros a month, which is 850 euros less than their counterparts in France or Germany.

Asking for 40% increase in basic salary

The union is asking for a 40% increase in the basic salary, plus an increment for the number of hours they fly. “To match the level earned by our colleagues in France we would need an 80% pay rise, and we know that is impossible in the current economic situation,” he said.

Ryanair cabin crew in Spain announced recently that they will be striking on 24, 25, 26 and 30 June and 1 and 2 July, and the first three days of those protests will coincide with others called by their counterparts in Belgium, Portugal, France and Italy. In total, 2,700 Ryanair employees in five countries will be joining the strikes.

Meanwhile, a meeting to try to mediate between representatives of easyJet cabin crew in Spain and the company has ended without agreement, but both sides have agreed to continue discussions until 30 June. For the moment, the strikes are still due to take place and will do so unless there is progress.