Researchers study the prehistoric rock art of the cave. / SUR

Benalmádena begins documentation of the prehistoric rock art of the Cueva del Toro

The project, which was given the green light by the regional government, will bring together more than thirty renowned specialists in prehistoric archaeology from Spain, Portugal, Italy, Germany, China and the UK

Tony Bryant
TONY BRYANT

Benalmádena town hall has announced that it has received the green light from the regional government for the study and graphic documentation of the prehistoric rock art of the Cueva del Toro cave.

Directed by the researcher of the University of Cadiz, Diego Salvador Fernández Sánchez, a doctor who specialises in palaeolithic art, the project will bring together more than thirty renowned specialists in prehistoric archaeology and rock art from Spain, Portugal, Italy, Germany, China and the UK.

The researchers will also have the support of the Culture department at Benalmádena town hall, which will provide help in logistics, preparation of required technical documentation, and in the future dissemination of data once the scientific work has been carried out.

The Cueva del Toro, also known as Cueva del Calamorro due to its location in the Cerro del Calamorro (at the foot of the Sierra de Mijas), was discovered in 1969 by Manuel Giménez.

Giménez published his findings in the Zephyrus magazine in 1972, which earned the cave the designation of an asset of cultural interest (BIC).

However, the cave has been the target of vandalism over the years and some of the paintings have been badly damaged.

Councillor for Culture Pablo Centella said, “This project will put an end to the phase of abandonment, turning the site into the spearhead of prehistoric archaeology and bringing it closer to the scientific methodology of the 21st century.”

“Research, publication and high dissemination will go hand in hand in a project of great scientific and patrimonial scope that seeks to recover and protect the oldest heritage of Benalmádena,” he added.