Freeda Nature at a previous presentation of her project / sur

Architect to present her alternative vision for Maro sugar cane factory

The exhibition will run for a week, from 2 April until 9 April, with meetings open to the public on both Saturdays. The factory sits on a plot of land that developers and Nerja town hall have in their sights for the development of a golf course, along with hotels and housing

Jennie Rhodes
JENNIE RHODES

German permaculture architect and ecological engineer, who goes by the artistic name of Freeda Nature, will be holding another presentation of her architectural vision for the abandoned San Joaquín sugar cane factory in Maro from 2 to 9 April in Nerja.

The factory sits on the Vega de Maro; the plot of land that developers and Nerja town hall have in their sights for the development of a golf course, along with hotels and housing.

The proposed development faces angry opposition from local residents and people who farm the land, many of whom are families whose ancestors have grown crops there for generations.

Model and presentations

Freeda held a presentation in October last year and will be repeating it at the office of the Unidas Podemos political party at 15 Calle Granada 51 in Nerja.

The presentation-cum-exhibition will run for a week, from 2 until 9 April, with a presentation by Freeda on both Saturdays (2 and 9 April) at 6pm. There will be a model version of Freeda's proposal and at the two presentations, an opportunity to ask questions and give feedback.

Freeda said that participants will have the chance to "bring suggestions to the project, since it is in development phase," and added, "We are open to including and adapting it to the needs and wishes of the local community." The presentation will be given in Spanish, English and German.

In addition, BAM (Bio Agricultura Maro) will give a presentation of their work on Friday 8 April at 8pm. The collective of organic growers in Maro and Nerja was born in 2020 when small-scale local farmers were left without an outlet to sell their products as the pandemic hit.

They now sell their produce at local markets and by ordering via their website as well as running a series of community initiatives, such as beach and river clean-ups.

A model of what the sugar cane factory would look like / sur