Primary poetry

A selection of poems written by children aged up to 11 and submitted to the SUR in English Education and Learning supplement

Best primary poem

My house

My home is now two houses,

Mom's and Dad's.

For me, it's just one.

They help me to be happy in each one.

We are still a family and will always be united.

They make it all special,

They are the tractor of my life,

Something without equal.

It's amazing

Without them I couldn't live.

The truth is

They are my home.

Daniella Velarde Sánchez, age 7

MIT School

Singer-songwriter Peter Edgerton highlighted the “extraordinarily powerful opening line” of this poem, ‘My home is now two houses’: “It sets the scene for a very moving piece. Good pace, well-rounded. Excellent work.”

Special mention primary poem

Scrap yard

The truth is the Iron man was excited because he had never seen such a beautiful, delicious scrap yard. There were……..

Metallic, magnetic tractors,

Massive, rusty railway engines,

Sharp, shiny guns,

Broken, old springs,

Circular, smooth buttons,

Big, black cars,

Enormous, thick bedsteads,

Thin, rusty spoons,

Round, bent pans,

Big, long gates.

F. H. O. age 8

Almuñécar International School

Singer-songwriter Peter Edgerton said: “Magnificent imagination seeing the scrap yard as a potential feast. Strong, earthy vocabulary evocative of the scene. Very Good.”

Selected primary poem

Where's my tractor

Johnny lost his tractor

He looked……

Under the bed

Which was red

Behind the curtains

He asked some merchants

He asked the fairy

Who took his tooth

(Will she tell the truth?)

He climbed a tree

Where he saw a bee

In the fridge

And over the bridge

He looked in the garden

He said to his cat,

“I beg your pardon,

My tractor, where could it be?”

He asked Mary

“My tractor, where could it be?”

He searched all day and night

“My tractor, where could it be?

I’ve been everywhere

Where I could possible be

Where could it be?”

“In the toy box,” said mum.

William Thiem, age 9

Laude San Pedro International College

The judges loved the way this poem evoked an all-too-familiar situation: after looking for something in all sorts of imaginative places, it rather disappointingly turns up where it was supposed to be.