Two out of three drivers do not understand how to use a roundabout correctly. / sur

Two out of three drivers in Spain don't know how to use a roundabout correctly

The Directorate-General for Traffic has drawn attention to the accident rate at roundabouts, with a diagram to help explain the correct way to use them

S.M. Madrid

The first roundabout in Spain was built in 1976, but according to the Axa insurance company two out of every three Spanish drivers still do not know how to use them properly. According to the Directorate-General for Traffic (DGT), between 2015 and 2019 there were 45,000 accidents at roundabouts, in which 317 people died and 58,000 were injured.

According to Automovilistas Europeos Asociados, ten per cent of traffic accidents occur at roundabouts. This is not the first time that an authority has turned to social media to raise awareness of the need to learn how to use them properly. A month ago, the Guardia Civil did the same.

In their latest tweet, the DGT has drawn attention to the accident rate at roundabouts, with a diagram to help explain the correct way to use them.

They also offer advice for new drivers, such as staying calm at all times and to use the indicators, no matter how obvious it is what you are about to do. Cyclists who are in a group have to be considered as a single vehicle, so when one of them enters or exits a roundabout the others have preference, even above vehicles which are using the roundabout at the time.

And finally, if the traffic makes it impossible to change lane, the DGT says, it is best to go round the roundabout again before attempting to do so. Therefore, when approaching the exit you need, you should be in the outside lane and indicate so that other drivers know you are leaving the roundabout.

It is important to remember, says the DGT, that it is not permitted to exit a roundabout from the inside lanes because this can cause one of the most common accidents: crossing the path of a vehicle which is in the correct lane.