The park has been closed since August 2020. / PEDRO J. QUERO

Tivoli owners refuse to listen to offers to revive the park, and fight moves to protect the land

Tremón rejected an offer from Parques Reunidos in 2019 and has ignored a recent bid from a fairground firm to rent and manage the facilities

IVÁN GELIBTER

Attempts by Benalmádena town hall and the private sector to revive Tivoli World, the iconic Costa del Sol theme park, closed for more than a year, have so far fallen on deaf ears.

While furloughed workers have been keeping the grounds clean and tidy, the park's owner Tremón has said nothing about a potential reopening, and appeared to have ignored different offers on the table.

The local fairground attraction firm Bañuls recently put forward a proposal to rent and manage the theme park, although, according to sources the owners have refused even to hear it.

It has also emerged this week that Parques Reunidos (the group that manages attractions such as Selwo Aventura, Selwo Marina and the Benalmádena cable car) also attempted to negotiate a possible purchase or lease of Tivoli World back in 2019, before the pandemic.

According to sources from Parques Reunidos, the meeting had been set up by the mayor of Benalmádena, Víctor Navas, and the Tivoli owners showed no interest.

"They put a series of questions on the table that only went to show that they had no interest in parting with with park. And it's a shame, because it's an emblem of the Costa del Sol that could be profitable," said the sources.

While details of that offer have not emerged, the proposal put forward by Bañuls, which Tremón has refused even to hear, has been made public. The Andalusian firm had offered to take over the 90 members of staff and the park's income and expenses, in exchange for 600,000 euros a year.

The firm said it would totally renate the park "especially" for the 50th anniversary which ought to be celebrated in 2022.

Meanwhile Tremón has only broken its silence to announce legal action against Benalmádena town hall. It considers the decision by the council to protect the land occupied by the theme park from possible speculation to be a "misuse of power".

It was back in August that councillors voted to modify the local town plans to establish that if the land ceased to be used for an amusement park, the town hall could take action to make it municipal property.

During that debate, Navas said: "Tivoli is profitable, as it showed in the summer of 2020 [when it opened for two months] after the strict lockdown, and for that reason there are firms interested in buying the amusement park, some even showing their intention to take on the current debt, but Tremón must sit down and negotiate with the potential buyers."