Isabel Rodríguez during the tour of the municipal food bank on Thursday. / SUR

Government minister pays surprise visit to Mijas food bank

The visit coincided with the announcement that the Spanish government has approved a draft law on the prevention of food losses and waste that will oblige stores to donate out of date products to food banks and charities

Tony Bryant
TONY BRYANT

The minister of Territorial Policy and government spokesperson, Isabel Rodríguez, paid a surprise visit to the municipal food bank in Mijas while visiting the town on Thursday.

The minister, who was accompanied by the government delegate in Andalucía, Pedro Fernández, and the town’s mayor, Josele González, was given a tour of the food bank by members of the Red Cross. The local branch of the charity oversees the management of the program that supports about a hundred families in the municipality with food distributed by the Spanish Agricultural Guarantee Fund.

Rodríguez, who referred to local politics as “the one that transforms and improves people's lives,” highlighted the government’s commitment to ensure that fewer people will have to make use of these types of facilities.

“We have attended to the most vulnerable families with the minimum vital income so that they can organise their lives and do not have to resort to resources such as the food bank,” she said

Draft law

The visit coincided with the announcement that the government has approved a draft law on the prevention of food losses and waste.

The future law will oblige all agents in the food chain to draw up a plan to prevent waste. Supermarkets will be forced to sell misshapen fruit and veg cheaply and donate unsold out-of-date products to food banks and charities. The law also includes measures for the transformation of foods that are not sold, but which maintain optimal conditions of consumption, into products such as juices and preserves, while restaurants will have to offer clients the chance to take home any food they have not eaten.