It's not worth risking your life just to jump off a rock, Malaga's councillor for Beaches says. / sur

Malaga council is to ban people from jumping into the sea from rocks

The move comes after a 24-year-old was partially paralysed following an accident of this type earlier in September

JUAN CANO Malaga

Malaga council is to ban people from jumping off rocks on the city’s beaches into the sea, because it is so dangerous. The move comes after a 24-year-old suffered very serious injuries recently when he hit his head after leaping into the water from a rock on the Peñón del Cuervo beach.

The councillor for Beaches, Teresa Porras, has confirmed that the ban will be included in the next modification of municipal bylaws. These are reviewed every year before the summer so they can be adapted to changing circumstances.

She also called on beach users in the meantime not to endanger their lives just for the experience of jumping off a rock. When the ban comes into force, anybody who fails to comply can be fined.

Fifty spinal injuries a year

Although this may appear to have been an isolated accident, around 50 spinal injuries a year in Spain are caused by this practice and most of those affected are young men.

The 24-year-old who was injured on 17 September remains in hospital and cannot move his legs. Doctors are hoping he might be able to recover some mobility in the future if, as they hope, the spinal damage can be reversed.

That was the second serious accident of this type this summer. In June a 19-year-old drowned after jumping off the Pico del Tarzán on Burriana beach in Nerja. Although his death is being investigated, the initial hypothesis was that he had been knocked out by the impact when he hit the water after jumping from a height of approximately ten metres.

Nerja council had already banned this practice in January 2021 and issues fines ranging from 751 to 1,500 euros for anyone who is caught jumping from rocks on its beaches.

In some areas nearby, such as Salobreña in Granada province, the council fines offenders 3,000 euros.