Jesús Aguirre, in a file image. / EDUARDO BRIONES

Junta de Andalucía confirms the first case of monkeypox in Malaga province

The regional government’s Ministry of Health has another 19 cases under investigation; 13 are in Malaga province, two in Cadiz, one in Seville and three in Almeria. The number of confirmed cases has now risen to four

EUROPA PRESS Granada

The Junta de Andalucía has this Monday, 30 May, confirmed the first case of monkeypox in Malaga province. This was reported by the regional government’s Minister of Health and Families, Jesús Aguirre, who said that there are now a total of four confirmed cases in Andalucía; with two in Seville, one in Cadiz and the one in Malaga. Aguirre has added that there are another 19 cases under investigation, "five are probable, because the epidemiological chain confirms that there has been contact with positives, and 14 are suspected," he said. On the other hand, another 13 cases have been ruled out.

Of the 19 cases that are currently under investigation, the head of the Junta’s Ministry of Health said that 13 are in Malaga, two in Cádiz, one in Seville and three in Almería.

Aguirre gave the update during a visit to the ‘GammaKnife' radiosurgery system, at the Doctor Olóriz Hospital in Granada and added that "all of this information is being sent directly to Madrid to be recorded at the national level”.

Recovering

In addition, the head of Health specified that the four positives are male and in all cases "they are imported from other regions where they have had risky relationships that have been the cause of contagion." He also pointed out that "everyone is recovering, there has been no need for any hospital admission and they are in self-isolation at home."

Monkeypox is a rare viral zoonotic disease. The initial symptoms usually include fever, headache, muscle aches, swollen or swollen glands, and tiredness.

A few days after the onset of fever, a skin rash develops, often starting on the face and then spreading to other parts of the body. It is usually a self-limited disease and most people recover in several weeks, although in some cases they may require hospital admission.