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Coca Boom. / Migue Fernández

Coca Boom

'If we all did the same thing, where's the fun in that?'

This transvestite from Malaga has spent more than five years shaping her character and her show, which is based on American cabaret and the atmosphere of Broadway

Like Spanish singer Rosalía when she sings “Saoko, papi, saoko”, the extraordinary Coca Boom is transformed the moment she puts on her heels, her flawless make-up and glamorous outfits that sparkle with charisma. She is a singing diva.

Through her sensual American burlesque performances, Coca Boom has carved a niche for herself on the national drag scene. During the interview she explains that her early drag act was much tamer than the shows she puts on now. It was five years ago when she decided to step up her performance and do what she had always dreamed of, “It was hard to find my character and in the end I found her on Broadway, a very American cabaret," she says with sincerity and pride.

Coca Boom. / Migue Fernández

"It was hard to find my character and in the end I found her on Broadway"

"If you want to dance, don't do the same as everybody else"

"If you are not trained in anything and you are just waiting to be called, it's like being a waiter without a contract"

Coca Boom explains that her best nights are with fresh audiences, when she goes to other towns, and the warm applause gives her energy to refresh her music, outfits and make-up. There’s a wonderful "effervescence" when she steps "out of my comfort zone" .

She says that the key is to be different from everyone else: "If you want to do comedy, don't do what everyone else does. If you want to dance, don't do what everybody else does. You have to explore in your character what sets you apart from the pack and fight for it. If we all do the same thing, where's the fun in it?" she says with passion.

However, the future of these new drag performers on the Malaga scene is still up in the air. This artist explains that in Spain "drag is not well valued or understood", as there are still many gaps when it comes to performing a show in in a bar: "If you are not trained in anything and you are just waiting to be called, it's like being a waiter without a contract, or any other job that is not legally regulated. It's difficult, there are many places where I have a contract, but others where I don't. That's a bit of a taboo," she ends with a nervous laugh and gritted teeth. Bring on the next diva!