Sunbathing on a Marbella beach in autumn. / reuters

How long is this Indian summer likely to last?

For Malaga province, the forecast for today, Tuesday 4 October, is for a high of 32C in the Antequera area, 30C in the Serranía de Ronda, 28C in Malaga city, 26C in the Axarquía and 25C on the Costa del Sol

RAQUEL MERINO Malaga

Just as many people were taking their coats out of the wardrobe and putting away the beach chairs and sunshades, the temperatures have risen again and it seems much more like summer than autumn. What is known as an Indian summer in English is called ‘veranillo de San Miguel’ or ‘veroño’, a mixture of verano and otoño (summer and autumn) in Spanish; it is a period of exceptionally dry and warm weather which usually occurs around the San Miguel saint’s day, 29 September.

But how long is it going to last? Normally it is about one week, and Spain's state Aemet weather agency says it should remain like this until Sunday. In fact, from Thursday the minimum temperature are expected to rise and Cordoba could see a daytime high of 34C, which would be between five and ten degrees hotter than normal. ,

“The days and nights are going to be hot for this time of year,” confirmed Juan de Dios del Pino, Aemet’s representative in Andalucía, Ceuta and Melilla, but there are also going to be strong easterly winds from Wednesday until at least Saturday.

For Malaga province, the forecast for today, Tuesday 4 October, is for a high of 32C in the Antequera area, 30C in the Serranía de Ronda, 28C in Malaga city, 26C in the Axarquía and 25C on the Costa del Sol.

From Wednesday and until Sunday the maximum temperatures should be between 24C and 27C.

Although a system of low pressure at high levels of the atmosphere will bring some rain to eastern Andalucía it will not be much, according to expert José Luis Escudero on his blog Tormentas y Rayos. And Aemet has said that Malaga will hardly be affected at all, apart from the possibility of occasional showers on the Costa del Sol and in some inland areas.