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Strict new clocking-on rules come in to force to protect workers' rights

All firms will now be forced to record how long staff work.
All firms will now be forced to record how long staff work. / SUR
  • Companies can use traditional methods, like pen and paper, or more advanced online tools and must keep records for four years or face a fine

From this Sunday, Spanish law forces company bosses to keep a tighter control on the hours their staff work as the country introduces some of the strictest rules in the world.

The government says that it wants to fight against firms taking advantage of their staff and to make sure that they pay proper overtime. Trade union data claims that three million hours a week of overtime go unpaid or aren't compensated with time in lieu. This represents some 44 per cent of hours worked.

It's up to each company how it records the hours, either using new technology or with a manual list. Online or GPS systems are available in the market, say experts, although many are initially expected to resort to tried-and-tested pen and paper. The lists have to be kept for four years in case there is a workplace inspection.