surinenglish

Third lane on the A-7 at Puerto Banús given initial go-ahead by central government

Queues are a frequent occurrence on this part of the network.
Queues are a frequent occurrence on this part of the network. / J-L
  • Plans to improve the coastal dual carriageway between San Pedro and Puerto Banús can now start to be drawn up

The Ministry for Public Works, Fomento, has given its approval for a plan to add a third lane to the A-7 between San Pedro de Alcántara and Puerto Banús to be drawn up, according to an announcement made by Marbella town hall on Tuesday.

The news broke following a meeting between mayor Ángeles Muñoz and the Fomento minister, Iñigo de la Serna, in Madrid during which they discussed the improvement works, which have a budget of 17.8 million euros.

The project will see access roads to the A-7 revised, the widening of the carriageways in both directions, the broadening of exits km 172 and 174, improvements to pedestriation overpasses, as well as the creation of an all-new one to connect Puerto Banús and Nueva Andalucía. Once the plans are drawn up, they will be put out to tender.

Keeping traffic moving

The mayor, speaking after this development, emphasised the significance of the project, “not only because of the size of the budget, but also because of its capacity to keep traffic moving and bring an end to the tailbacks which start on the stretch between San Pedro and Puerto Banús”.

Muñoz also stressed that the project would “increase road safety but also that of pedestrians”.

The mayor of Marbella also highlighted the “will and speed with which the central government has acted”, given that only two weeks had passed since she and deputy mayor for San Pedro, Rafael Piña, met with the head of road demarcation in Malaga, José Antonio Domingo, to set the ball rolling.

Daily tailbacks

The four kilometres which separate the exits to Puerto Banús and San Pedro are one of the most serious black spots for traffic in Marbella, especially during the summer months, when visitor numbers swell and motorists are trapped in jams daily.