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Torremolinos joins forces with other leading tourist resorts in a bid to improve the industry

The mayors signed a joint statement in Madrid on Tuesday.
The mayors signed a joint statement in Madrid on Tuesday. / SUR
  • Eight municipalities from the Spanish Costas and the Canaries have formed an alliance to improve tourism nationwide

Representatives from eight tourist towns on Spain's Costas, including Torremolinos, and the Canary Islands met in Madrid this week to form an alliance of tourism-based municipalities. They hope that by joining forces they will carry more weight, for example when dealing with the European Union, and they hope to guarantee the success that the tourism industry has enjoyed for more than half a century.

The municipalities signed a declaration which sets out ways to develop future strategies and calls for a different financial strategy to be applied for resorts such as Calviá, Benidorm, Adeje, Arona, Lloret de Mar, Salou , San Bartolomé de Tirajana and Torremolinos. The population of all these towns increases sixfold in peak tourist periods, and on average they earn four million euros a year from tourists staying overnight in local hotels.

The alliance was made official at the United Nations World Tourism headquarters in Madrid, and the mayors of the municipalities described it as a huge step towards ensuring that they can remain competitive.

Juan Molas, the president of the CEHAT national association of hotels and tourist accommodation, said the strength of this alliance is highlighted by the fact that these eight destinations attract more than 10.5 million tourists a year and are the most popular choice for people who come to Spain on holiday.

Meanwhile, the mayor of Torremolinos, José Ortiz, announced that a series of workshops have been organised so the towns can exchange experiences and design new strategies to restructure the industry so it can meet the demands of modern tourists. This will also help the whole of the Costa del Sol and tourism in general. However, he warned that "there is still a lot of work to do", and that future negotiations will be needed with the European Union.