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Marketing and Business graduates use skills to create Holy Week souvenir company

Francisco Gutiérrez and Daniel Escalona with their products.
Francisco Gutiérrez and Daniel Escalona with their products. / SUR
  • Daniel Escalona and Francisco Gutiérrez have already received dozens of orders for personalised products from religious associations in Andalucía

Two young university graduates from Vélez-Málaga have set up their own business selling Holy Week souvenirs. Daniel Escalona, 25, who has a degree in Marketing and his friend, Francisco Gutiérrez, 23, a Business Management and Administration graduate, found inspiration for the business, called Tintineo, while watching the processions in Malaga last year.

"Many of the things we offer are things we would like to have had when we were 15, because in my case I decorated my school folders with photos and images of the processions and thinking about that is what led to products which suit all ages and profiles," says Escalona.

As Holy Week approaches, the pair have already received dozens of orders from different religious associations across Andalucía. Associations are able to order products such as bags, notebooks, bookmarks, puzzles, mobile phone covers and baby clothes with their own designs. Miniature replicas of the 'thrones' are also available, thanks to the collaboration of painter, Martín España.

"There are other similar companies, but none that offer such a personalised service and that are able to adapt to the requests of different groups," the pair says about their company.

Tintineo comes from a word that Antonio Banderas used when he was the 'pregonero' (person who formally starts an event) for the 2011 Holy Week in Malaga, which Daniel and Francisco explain, describes the sound that the floats make as they are carried through the streets.

The company currently sells its products in the Mayka bookshop in Malaga and Yerma bookshop in Vélez-Málaga. There are plans to sell in further outlets in Antequera, Seville and Jerez de la Frontera. "We want people to be able to enjoy Holy Week all year," they say.